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20110701
20110731
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efforts with pakistan. currently the u.k. is the second-largest of the foreign military force in afghanistan. from london, this is just under an hour. >> thank you, mr. speaker. with permission i would like to make a statement on afghanistan. formerly i said this government has sought to take a more hard hit security based approach to the mission.vernment as i've said, we are not there to build a perfect democracy, still a model society.re yes, we will help with the detablishment of demographicild institutions and yes, we can improve infrastructure, develop education, encourage democrac development, but we are in afghanistan. we can improve infrastructure, develop education and encourage development the we are in afghanistan for one overriding reason, to shore our own national security by helping the afghans take control of theirs. that means building up security forces to drive down british combat forces where the afghans themselves able to prevent al qaeda from returning and posing a threat to us and our allies around the world. this is poignant today on a plot executed by a
to ensure civilians in pakistan would not be hit a unmanned drones the united states was using get the taliban and al qaeda. tonight new evidence that this confidence is simply wrong. is part of this to do with a chill in relations between pakistan and washington? >> it is indeed of course. of course. desai's been a secret war as you like conducted by the cia in pakistan using these unmanned aircraft. if one looks at the history of it, one can see how it is ramped up but now there are questions in the wake -- of course the vast majority of these raids have been carried out in so-called tribal areas on the border with afghanistan, and over the years the number has gone up steadily. in the first few years in the strikes of 2,042,007 they're just a handful and then we see it going up in 2010. the obama administration rising at a policy never fully publicly articulated. 118 strikes last year and 45 so far this year. the pakistanis said a couple of months ago that they wanted him stopped them stopped and they ordered the cia out in their base in pakistan were some of the strikes are bei
perhaps the most important conflicts of the world today. elisa is currently in pakistan where she is kind of tied down by advance. they're as a journalist and is being advised not to move for obvious reasons. so we salute her an absence and invite her editor. come on up and get the award on her behalf. [applause] [applause] >> thank you, and thank you to the sponsor of the award. eliza is in pakistan. and if i know her she is somehow chasing the story. the aftermath is something that will have an effect on the ground there. if anyone can get the story, eliza griswold can. the book that we -- she gave the subtitle dispatches from the fall line between christianity and islam as the title "the tenth parallel" for the line that she followed in the book, but it could just as well have had the title common ground. the drama that she is working out of the book is very similar to the one that is worked out in the classic book. people of very different beliefs with similar geographic space. religious strife in israel and grim, but the long history of every day encounters of believers of different
conflicts in the world today. a life that is currently in pakistan, where she is tied down by events and there is a journalist being advised not to move for obvious reasons. and we salute her in assets and nature editor and teacher award on her behalf. [applause] >> thank you, nick and thank you to be a sponsor of the award of the journalism school. i know i am somehow in that story, even if the aftermath of the killing of the modern is something that will have effect on the ground there and anyone can get that story if griswold can. the book that she gave this a title dispatches from the fault line between christianity and islam has the title of the 10th parallel, the line that as she followed the book, could just as well have the title common ground because the drama is working under the work is similar to the one regarding this classic book. it is a code of different beliefs to the similar geographic space. he lives tries to make this point i tend to book for christians and muslims need, but the long history of everyday encounter of levers of different kinds, shouldering all thing
into pakistan is causing a huge number of attacks there. and so what's been occurring is not just a large number of suicide attacks but a large number of anti-american-inspired suicide attacks. >> so besides the obvious policy of pulling out, is there another policy? >> absolutely. >> to prevent this. >> because pulling out, simply abandons our interests, ignores our interests. what this book suggests is a middle ground policy called offshore balancing. offshore balancing continues to pursue our core security interests and obligations in overseas regions but does so with over the horizon, naval power, intelligence assets, relies on economic assets and political tools and this is the core policy that we pursue as the united states for decades in major regions of the world, such as the middle east with great success, and we should return to this policy. >> can you give us specifics about how we should pursue the policy in the middle east. >> in the 1970s and '80s, the united states had core interests in the middle east including the persian gulf and we maintained and secured those interests withou
interests or an authorization debate in the congress. given all that is at stake in pakistan, afghanistan, iran, saudi arabia, egypt, syria, yemen and elsewhere in the islamic world, a rational strategic assessment would not devote sizable american military and economic resources to a civil war in libya. it is an expensive diversion that leaves the united states and our european allies with fewer assets to respond to other contingencies. under the constitution, it is our responseability to determine whether we should be a party to libya's civil war. as a part of this process we will consider the terms and scope of the joint resolution before us today. i'm concerned this resolution would provide broad authorities, permitting significant expansion of the united states military involvement in libya's civil war. the resolution would authorize the president to reescalate united states military involvement in libya, to and potentially beyond the lead role it played at the beginning of the operation when the united states carried out intensive airstrikes on a daily basis. the resolution would on
to go to for jihadists and afghanistan, iran, excuse me, afghanistan, iraq, pakistan or yemen but as many as two dozen muslim americans and al-shabaab with many cases trained by al qaeda leaders remain unaccounted for. the committee has found that all chabad related federal prosecutions for funding, recruiting and attempting to join al-shabaab are the largest number and most significant upward trend in the terror cases filed for the justice department over the past two years. least 38 cases have been unsealed since 2009. minnesota, ohio, california, new jersey, new york, illinois, alabama, virginia and texas three al-shabaab is recruiting inside american mosques and disalle communities like minneapolis and san diego. according to the justice department. this month and also of recruiter pleaded guilty to a recording a large group of muslims from minneapolis at mosques and without any known protest moscow's leaders. a top also leader in somalia supervised this recruiting. one minnesota recruited was a suicide bomber whose 2008 attack on northern somalia send shock waves of alarm
to pakistan? and afghanistan? why send all of that money over there? get our troops out of all of these other countries that we need them in. germany and philippines and all of the other places anymore. >> host: here's leslie -- excuse me, tammy in leslie, kentucky. >> caller: yes, they need to bring our troops home and stop spending the millions of billions. they need to help out the people on social security. it's hard to make it especially when you have a family. >> host: florida, linda on the independent line. where do things stand with the debt and deficit negotiations? >> caller: i think personally it's all bull crap. you've got people that is -- has been on the social security because they are either disabled or whatever. bring our troops home. we don't need to support pakistan. look what they did to us, we don't need to support iran. bring us home. get us out of that situation. we have people out here that fought for the country. now they are going to suffer because he wants to cut back the social security, medicare, and medicaid? that's nuts. i think just bring our people home. start
's why. how many wars are we fighting now? let's name them. afghanistan, iraq, pakistan, libya, and soon as mr. leon panetta says, we'll be fighting in iran. we have military operations all over the middle east. why can't we divert some of those funds, cut some of those wars and not cut social security because social security never impacted on our debt. social security was funded all along so why are we cutting social security? >> guest: well, let me just assure you we are not going to cut social security, okay? i think there might be efforts in the house to cut social security, and it might possibly pass, although i certainly know that the cut cap and whatever it's called won't pass because it requires a two-thirds vote and you need 50 democrats to vote for it, and i don't believe we'll have 50 democrats to vote for it, but i guarantee you if any measure passed the house of social security, it would not be taken up in the senate, and if it did, i believe the president would veto it. you know, you're a retiree, paid into social security, all of your working life, and you deserve to conti
and pakistan ended with the demise of osama bin laden. with the efforts to railroad the target's knott however. indeed the extensive efforts that we as the industry have devoted to enhance since the 9/11 attacks have been promised free much of this reality. following 9/11 connect and on their own initiative, the real words made top-level security task force existing of more than 150 industry experts to conduct a thorough evaluation of risk and security and then network. the focus areas include critical infrastructure, the rail operations, hazardous materials, communications and control systems and military shipments. this effort produced the rail industry's risk analysis and security management plan. it is a comprehensive priority based action the industry developed to deal with new realities. this is adopted by the industry in december of 2001 within three months of the 9/11 attacks and remains the foundation of the efforts today updated on the experience and its usage and changing circumstances with the threat. the plan defines the progressively tighter security of low levels and details the
. and with the reporting and al qaeda in the operation and pakistan ended with the demise of osama bin laden. with the efforts to railroad the target's knott however. indeed the extensive efforts that we as the industry have devoted to enhance since the 9/11 attacks have been promised free much of this reality. following 9/11 connect and on their own initiative, the real words made top-level security task force existing of more than 150 industry experts to conduct a thorough evaluation of risk and security and then network. the focus areas include critical infrastructure, the rail operations, hazardous materials, communications and control systems and military shipments. this effort produced the rail industry's risk analysis and security management plan. it is a comprehensive priority based action the industry developed to deal with new realities. this is adopted by the industry in december of 2001 within three months of the 9/11 attacks and remains the foundation of the efforts today updated on the experience and its usage and changing circumstances with the threat. the plan defines the pro
as the leadership in pakistan comes under pressure, it is not able to be fined a safe haven. since the fall in 1991, somalia both now areas of somalia have been the only areas of effective governance. they seek international recognition, but others do not. while they recognize obvious support the eventually integration into greater somalia requires ongoing support. today's hearing offers a valuable opportunity to examine u.s. policy on a variety of issues involving somalia. i'd like to now turn to ranking member, mr. payne, for any comments he might have. >> thank you very. let me thank you for calling the very important joint hearing on assessing the consequences of the failed state of somalia. and it's a pleasure to see my good friend, mr. royce back who chaired the subcommittee at some point in the past and has maintained a strong interest as have congressman smith. and so it's a pleasure to be here at this very important hearing. unfortunately, i will have to leave a few minutes before ii. -- 2:00. i've been invited to be a part of the presidential delegation that will celebrate the new state o
interoperable for all of our first responders. the successful mission in pakistan recently that seal team 6 completed in bringing justice to osama bin laden. but there is so much more that we need to do in bringing response, prepared this, -- dness, prevention. we would like to prevent every homicide from ever happening. but every unit has prevention as well as apprehension because there is no way to ultimately prevent some of these bad actors from getting through. but the most important defense we have is one another. and we are a citizenry that is taking action. i will turn it over to you to talk about border security. >> thank you, governor o'malley. let's turn to our first panelist. we are very pleased to have deputy commissioner david aguilar from the department of homeland security. he also serves as chief operating officer, overseeing 57,000 employees, and managing and operations budget of more than $11 billion. prior to this position, mr. aguilar served for more than 30 years with border patrol and was named chief of the border patrol in july of 2004. as chief, he has had over 20,0
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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